Free Knitting Pattern – Drop Stitch Swizzle Alpaca Scarf

Scarf Crocheted with Swizzle Alpaca Yarn

I love how this scarf turned out!

Scarf Crocheted with Swizzle Alpaca Yarn

The yarn I used is 100% alpaca so of course it is soft and lovely!  This yarn is hand-dyed.  The color is Academy Blue, one of the nine beautiful shades in the Swizzle line from The Alpaca Yarn Company available at Alpaca Meadows.

Swizzle Alpaca Yarn Scarf

 The pattern is by Christine Vogel of Frazzled Knits.  She is right, it does look beautiful in a variegated yarn.  The horizontal drop stitch makes it fun to knit … as the yarn overs are dropped, the lacy design is created!

Swizzle Alpaca Yarn Scarf

Learning to Knit – What You Will Need

Learning to knit can be a bit overwhelming, but once you’ve learned it can be very enjoyable, calming your mind while your hands stay busy.  All you really need is some yarn and a couple of knitting needles.

Choosing Yarn

One of the pleasures of knitting is working with beautiful yarn textures and colors, though choosing which yarn to use can be puzzling.  It is important to choose the right yarn for your knitting project.  This article from the Craftsy  on How to Choose and Use the Right Yarn Every Time is a very helpful resource.
Guide to Different Types of Yarn

Some suggest that beginners start with a medium worsted weight yarn. I like to use bulky yarns when teaching beginners to knit, because knitting goes faster, and gratification from a finished project comes sooner!  Yarn that is a solid color and light colored makes seeing the stitches easier.

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I frequently use a bulky yarn called Snuggle when teaching classes.  We typically use solid colors, but there are also some very pretty hand-painted colors too.

Hand-Painted Snuggle Yarn - A Plethora of PinksHand-Painted Snuggle Yarn - A Group of Greens

The yarn label tells you the size of the yarn.  Find something that is pretty and soft to the touch.  I highly recommend Alpaca Yarn, you can’t go wrong.  It is a treat to work with and helps make the learning curve of knitting more enjoyable!

Yarn Labels

Yarn has labels that provide lots of information, such as the type of yarn, the amount or yardage, fiber content, recommended needles to obtain the gauge, and care instructions. On the label you will also see yarn color names, numbers or dye lots. There can be subtle color differences between yarns dyed in different batches, so if yarn has a dye lot number, always be sure that you purchase enough of the same dye lot to finish a project. Some yarns will say “No Dye Lot Yarn” which means the fibers were dyed before they were spun so there should be no color differences. Many labels also include free patterns.

Here is How to Read a Yarn Label.

All yarn patterns require specific types of yarn, some mention a specific brand of yarn. Each type of yarn has a different thickness or “weight.” The knitting industry has adopted a Standard Yarn Weight System and uses number symbols from 0 to 7, with 0 being the finest called lace weight and 7, the thickest, called Jumbo.

Yarn Weights

Tools

Knitting Needles

There are many to choose from.  Straight knitting needles, which come in aluminum, plastic, wood or bamboo, are the most common. There is a point at one end of the needle, and a knob at the other, which prevents stitches from slipping off.  You may want to experiment with different needles to see which ones you like.  Every knitter has their favorites!

Bamboo or wood needles are great choices for beginners. Knitting stitches don’t slide off the needles as easily. They’re also very comfortable to work with. Plastic and aluminum are quite slippery and your knitting stitches can easily slip off the ends.

A numbering system is used for determining needle sizes, while in other countries a metric designation, which represents the actual circumference of the needle, is used. In most packaging you will see the metric sizing shown first, followed by the U.S. sizing in parenthesis. Knitting needles come in varying sizes, from 2.25 mm (1), the smallest, to size 19 mm (35) and larger.  They are sold in pairs, and come in 10″ or 14″ lengths.

The most important size you need to look for is the diameter.  This number will determine the size of the stitches on your needles and ultimately the size of your finished knitting project. The thicker the needle the bigger the stitches and the thinner the needle the smaller the stitches.

The length of the knitting needle is more of a personal choice. For bigger projects like sweaters or blankets that require lots of stitches, you will need the really long needles.  For smaller projects, shorter knitting needles are more comfortable. Again though this is a matter of personal preference.

Circular knitting needles, long, flexible needles with a point on each end, are less cumbersome, especially for large projects.  They eliminate the need for seams and to continually be turning turn your knitting at the end of a row.

For smaller projects that do not have seams (socks and mittens) “double-pointed knitting needles” are used. These come in sets of four and as their name suggests, there is a point on each end.

Essential Knitting Tools: How to Put Together a Knitting Kit
Essential Knitting Tools: How to Put Together a Knitting Kit

from: Craftsy

To start knitting, you only need two things: a pair of needles and a ball of yarn. If you want to finish a project, though, you’ll need a few more items. So what does an experienced knitter keep in a knitting kit?  Check out What’s in Your Knitting Kit?

Learn Essential Beginner Knitting Skills ins New Class | Craftsy
Learn Essential Beginner Knitting Skills in New Class

from: Craftsy

Depending on how you learn, a Knitting Class is always helpful when you are first learning, as well as when you’ve mastered the basics and are ready to move on to something more.  Craftsy offers many online Knitting Classes, with hours of instruction, and access anytime once you have purchased the class.  If you’re in our area, be sure to check out the Learn to Knit Class at Alpaca Meadows!

So, let’s move on to Getting Started!

 

Other good knitting resources:

Top 10 Yarn Questions

Holiday Hours at The Farm

We will kick off the holiday season, Saturday, November 26th with extended hours from 12pm – 5pm here at the farm.

 

Give a gift just a little out of the ordinary… something handmade perhaps…something made from alpaca!  Visit the farm and see the alpacas that produce this wonderful fiber.  Get your hands on some of the incredibly soft and warm items made from this luxurious fiber.  Give a gift that has value Shop for …

Blankets

Hats

Scarves

Socks

Texting Mittens

Gloves

Children’s Hats

Baby Booties

Headbands

Eye Glass Cases

Cell Phone & Ipod Cases

Christmas Ornaments

Many Handmade Alpaca Items


See our beautiful NEW alpaca blankets!  Pick up alpaca socks for Christmas gift giving, hats, scarves, mittens, gloves and many handmade alpaca items …

Get your hands on some alpaca fiber!  Luxurious, versatile, soft, warm, strong, resilient, natural and hypoallergenic, alpaca fiber offers many advantages and is considered by many to be the “miracle fiber”.   Once you get your hands on it, you will immediately understand the intrinsic value of everything produced from this fiber.

Alpaca Rovings for Spinning at Alpaca Meadows

Check out our brand NEW Fiber Studio full of gorgeous alpaca yarn and fiber, patterns, and fiber art kits.

Alpaca Meadows Farm Store

This will kick off our monthly Just Sit-n-Knit or Crochet or Spin on the second Saturday of the month.  Bring your knitting, crocheting, spinning, or whatever Christmas project you are working on.  Hang out with friends, relax, enjoy Christmas music, hot chocolate, and holiday refreshments!

Shop The Farm Store … Online, Open Anytime!

Did you know?

Archaeologists have discovered a great deal of alpaca fiber goods from graves and religious sites predating the Inca Empire
in South America, a true testament to the durability of alpaca fiber and its long history.

National Alpaca Farm Days

National Alpaca Farm Days is a weekend all across the country that alpaca farms will be open to the public.  Visit the website to see what farms are open near you.  If you’re in our area, hope you’ll stop by and see us!  We have moved and so have our alpacas … you can find us at
1200 Rock Road in Mansfield, Ohio … we are the first driveway past the bridge that crosses Route 30 as you travel north on
Rock Road.

 

We have many Handmade Items, including a large variety of Finger Puppets …  see our lovely NEW Alpaca Yarn, feel our beautiful NEW Alpaca Throws, shop for Christmas, stock up on Alpaca Socks for Winter!

 

Can’t make it this weekend?  The Farm Store will be open Saturdays from 2pm—5pm … OR we are open online anytime!

Matt and Julie Petty

Mark Twain Craft Bazaar

I am headed to the 26th Annual Mark Twain Craft Bazaar this weekend, November 6th,
in Westerville, Ohio.

fiber, festival, boutique, bazaar, show, craft, alpaca, yarn, hand made, hand crafted, unique, gifts, kits, Christmas, Alpaca Meadows, Westerville, Ohio

It is being held at the Westerville North High School at 950 County Line Rd, from 10am-3pm.

fiber, festival, boutique, bazaar, show, craft, alpaca, yarn, hand made, hand crafted, unique, gifts, kits, Christmas, Alpaca Meadows, Westerville, Ohio

The Mark Twain Craft Bazaar is one of the most highly anticipated holiday bazaars in Westerville.

fiber, festival, boutique, bazaar, show, craft, alpaca, yarn, hand made, hand crafted, unique, gifts, kits, Christmas, Alpaca Meadows, Westerville, Ohio

As it enters the 26th year, the Mark Twain Craft Bazaar has grown to include over 125 unique artists from throughout Ohio and welcomed 2000 patrons last year.

All items are beautifully hand crafted.

fiber, festival, boutique, bazaar, show, craft, alpaca, yarn, hand made, hand crafted, unique, gifts, kits, Christmas, Alpaca Meadows, Westerville, Ohio

The pictures are from my booth at A Wool Gathering this year in Yellow Springs, Ohio and show a sampling of what I will be taking to Westerville.

I had to include a picture of my helper, my 13 year old daughter, doing what 13 year-olds do best…

Alpaca Meadows