Alpaca and Llama Face Masks

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has issued an updated set of guidelines on wearing face coverings in public, including homemade face masks as the US struggles to fill a coronavirus-driven demand for more personal protective equipment.  If you love alpacas and llamas, like I do, you might enjoy checking out the alpaca and llama collection of face masks available.  You can click on either the picture, or the link below the picture, to purchase!

Many other designs available too!

I do a small amount of affiliate marketing so if you purchase one of the items in this post, I do receive a small percentage of the sale, and I thank you, especially during these difficult times!

Flock Of Alpacas Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom
Flock Of Alpacas Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom

(A group of alpacas is actually referred to as a herd.)

Bright Colorful Alpaca Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom
Bright Colorful Alpaca Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom

Alpaca Maskcom
Alpaca Maskcom

There’s no strong evidence that homemade masks and face coverings can keep you from acquiring the coronavirus, but there are some benefits.

Alpaca Cacti Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom
Alpaca Cacti Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom

Wearing a homemade face mask may block large particles ejected from sneezing and coughing.  They might help protect others from your sneezes and coughs if you acquired the virus but are otherwise asymptomatic and in public.  Face masks could encourage more mindful behavior, including avoiding touching one’s mouth, nose and eyes.  Last but not least, wearing a handmade face mask can give peace of mind.

Cute Alpacas Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom
Cute Alpacas Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom

Homemade face masks should be used in combination with appropriate social distancing.  Thorough hand-washing is still the most advocated medical advice for healthy people to avoid acquiring the virus.

Doodle Alpaca Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom
Doodle Alpaca Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom

Trendy Dressed Llama Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom
Trendy Dressed Llama Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom

Colorful Llamas Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom
Colorful Llamas Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom

Pattern Of Alpacas, Cute Llamas With Hats, Flowers Cloth Face Maskcom
Pattern Of Alpacas, Cute Llamas With Hats, Flowers Cloth Face Maskcom

Cute Llamas With Scarfs, Alpacas, Cactus, Stars Cloth Face Maskcom
Cute Llamas With Scarfs, Alpacas, Cactus, Stars Cloth Face Maskcom

Cute Llamas On Teal Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom
Cute Llamas On Teal Pattern Cloth Face Maskcom

For more Alpaca and Llama Face Mask designs, click here.

Homemade face masks are not medical-grade and are not in any way a substitute for N95 or surgical masks, but they do serve a purpose.

How to Make a Face Mask at Home

How to Make a Face Mask at Home

To start a DIY face mask, you’ll want these supplies on hand:

Cotton fabric

Elastic

A sewing kit or sewing machine

A nonporous yet breathable material to go between the fabric (this may be detailed in a pattern)

Some designs call for filter material, which is added in an effort to block smaller particles.

According to Etsy, “Tens of thousands of sellers have already augmented their product offerings to include fabric face masks, demand will very likely outpace our sellers’ existing supply.  That’s why we are continuing to let sellers know that those with the skill and materials may want to consider creating and selling face masks on Etsy.”

If you’re looking to donate homemade face masks, there are multiple options, including Joann Fabrics and hospitals and organizations on this list.

 

The video above shows How to Make a No-Sew Face Mask.  For a video on How to Crochet a Face Mask, click here and a video on How to Knit a Face Mask, click here.

Stay safe!

Guatemalan Weaving Ministry

On a mission trip to Guatemala with my daughter, I learned about a weaving ministry led by Hilda Perez.  Hilda teaches women in her village to weave.  She and her husband Roduel live in Ixcan, an area where many refugees settled after Guatemala’s civil war.  Not only is weaving a learned skill that helps to sustain the women’s families, it provides stress relief, and gives them a sense of purpose.  There’s something beautiful about helping to give another woman some purpose in her life. Hilda has about 40 women that participate in the weaving ministry.

Roduel and Hilda Perez

Hilda and Roduel travel over 10 hours to bring woven items to sell to the mission teams that travel to Santa Maria through a mission agency called Mission Impact. The items below are some that we brought back from our last trip.  They are now available in our Farm Store.  Proceeds will go towards purchasing more handwoven items from these talented women, and a portion of it will help fund mission trips back to Guatemala.

Guatemalan Handwoven ScarfFB7 (640x640)Guatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner
Guatemalan Handwoven PurseGuatemalan Handwoven ScarfGuatemalan Handwoven Bookcover
 Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf Guatemalan Handwoven PurseFBFB (480x640)
 Guatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf
 Guatemalan Handwoven Bookmarks Guatemalan Handwoven Purse Guatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner
 Guatemalan Handwoven Cases Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf IMG_5377 (640x640)
 Guatemalan Handwoven Cases Guatemalan Handwoven BagGuatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner
Guatemalan Handwoven PurseGuatemalan Handwoven ScarfGuatemalan Handwoven Purse
Guatemalan Handwoven BagGuatemalan Handwoven ScarfGuatemalan Handwoven Purse

Backstrap Weaving is an ancient art practiced for centuries in many parts of the world. It is still used today on a daily basis, in many parts of Guatemala by Mayan women, to weave fabric for their clothing and other needed household textiles such as shawls, baby wraps, tablecloths, washcloths, towels, and so much more.

The art of weaving has been passed on from mother to daughter, generation after generation. At birth, baby girls are presented with the necessary tools for weaving. At the age of eight or nine, Maya girls are taught to weave for the first time, by their mothers, older sisters, and older women.

The looms are simple, often handmade by the weaver, and easily portable because they can be rolled up when not in use. The back rod of the loom is tied to a tree or post while weaving and the other end has a strap that encircles the waist so that the weaver can move back or forward to produce the needed tension.

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A weaver using a backstrap loom usually sits on the ground but as the person ages that becomes more difficult and many will then use a small stool.

While Mayan textiles are used for daily clothing and provide protection against nature, they are also incorporated into ancient ceremonies and rituals. Women’s “traje” or traditional clothes consists of a “huipil” – a blouse made from a square or rectangular piece of woven fabric with a hole in the middle for the head and folded and stitched up the sides with arm holes. This is worn with a “corte,” a skirt that is tied at the waist with a woven belt. Textiles vary by community, and designs and colors are often indicative of a specific village. Women’s clothing identifies the woman as an individual within her culture, as well as communicating traditional Maya beliefs about the universe.

 

 

Rigid Heddle Weaving

Floor Loom Weaving

Simply Stunning Scarves

 

 

 

Alpaca Meadows