Free Knitting Pattern – Easy Mistake Stitch Scarf

This Easy Mistake Stitch Scarf is a pattern I like to use when teaching people how to knit.  This pattern is from the Purl Soho website.  I have adapted the pattern to use with our bulky Snuggle Yarn from the Alpaca Yarn Company, and big needles, so fewer stitches are needed when casting on than what is written in the original pattern.

Hand-Knit Ribbed Snuggle Scarf

SKILL LEVEL

Easy

NEEDLES

US 11 – 8.0 mm

MATERIALS

Two skeins of Snuggle Yarn

NOTE

Ribbing is the result of alternating knit and purl stitches within the same row.   Mistake rib is a multiple of 4+3

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

Approximately 60” long x 6” wide

easy_mistake_stitch_scarf_snuggle

DIRECTIONS

Cast on 19 stitches.

K2, p2, repeat to last 3 stitches, k2, p1.

  This scarf will take two skeins of yarn, which will require joining a new skein of yarn.  If possible do this at the end of the row.

Repeat the pattern for 60 inches or to desired length. That’s it!

If you plan to knit until you run out of yarn, you will need to be sure you will have enough yarn left to bind off.   Figure out how much yarn it takes you to knit one row, plus some extra.  You can measure off a few yards and then determine whether your row takes you more or less.  This will give you an approximate amount of yarn necessary to bind off.

Bind off stitches in stitch pattern.  Be sure to bind off loosely or the pattern will be “gathered” at the bound edge.  If you find the edge is too tight when binding off, use a larger needle to bind off.  Also, be sure to form the stitch on the straight part of the needle, not the tip.

Next, you will want to weave in the ends and block your scarf.  Blocking is an integral part of finishing a knitted item.  It will even out your stitches and allow your fiber to bloom!

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Be sure to check out the FREE Knitting Tutorials from Craftsy!

Knitting Stitches You Need to Know

You might also want to check out 10 Easy Scarf Knitting Patterns for Beginners and more Free Knitting Patterns on this website.

Happy knitting!

 

How To Use Hand Cards

The purpose of Hand Carding is to disentangle, separate, clean, straighten and blend fibers together for spinning into yarn.  Carding is a type of woolen preparation, where air is introduced between the fibers and can be trapped as you spin, resulting in a loftier yarn. The tools used are called Hand Cards.  Hand carders look a bit like hair brushes, and consist of two wooden paddles with sheets of fine metal teeth that brush out the fibers. Carding opens up locks of fiber and then aligns the individual fibers to be parallel with each other. Carded fibers are generally shorter, with longer and shorter fibers mixed together, and not completely smooth and even.  The result is a batt or rolag of lofty fiber that can them more easily be spun into yarn.

All-hand-cards-together

The Hand Cards available in our Online Store are made in the USA, by Strauch Fiber Equipment.  Watch the video below to see how to use them.

You may want to check out a great article on how to properly and efficiently use hand cards called “Care & Feeding of Handcards”  from the Earth Guild in Asheville, NC.

How To Prepare Wool For Spinning

For a great class on fiber preparation, check out  How To Prepare Wool For Spinning.  It is a Craftsy online class that you can watch at your convenience, and go back to when ever you want.  See more Spinning Classes here.

Guatemalan Weaving Ministry

On a mission trip to Guatemala with my daughter, I learned about a weaving ministry led by Hilda Perez.  Hilda teaches women in her village to weave.  She and her husband Roduel live in Ixcan, an area where many refugees settled after Guatemala’s civil war.  Not only is weaving a learned skill that helps to sustain the women’s families, it provides stress relief, and gives them a sense of purpose.  There’s something beautiful about helping to give another woman some purpose in her life. Hilda has about 40 women that participate in the weaving ministry.

Roduel and Hilda Perez

Hilda and Roduel travel over 10 hours to bring woven items to sell to the mission teams that travel to Santa Maria through a mission agency called Mission Impact. The items below are some that we brought back from our last trip.  They are now available in our Farm Store.  Many are listed in our Online Store, just click the images below. Proceeds will go towards purchasing more handwoven items from these talented women, and a portion of it will help fund mission trips back to Guatemala.

Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf FB7 (640x640) Guatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner
Guatemalan Handwoven Purse Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf Guatemalan Handwoven Bookcover
 Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf  Guatemalan Handwoven Purse FBFB (480x640)
 Guatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner  Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf
 Guatemalan Handwoven Bookmarks  Guatemalan Handwoven Purse  Guatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner
 Guatemalan Handwoven Cases  Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf  IMG_5377 (640x640)
 Guatemalan Handwoven Cases  Guatemalan Handwoven Bag Guatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner
Guatemalan Handwoven Purse Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf Guatemalan Handwoven Purse
Guatemalan Handwoven Bag Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf Guatemalan Handwoven Purse

Backstrap Weaving is an ancient art practiced for centuries in many parts of the world. It is still used today on a daily basis, in many parts of Guatemala by Mayan women, to weave fabric for their clothing and other needed household textiles such as shawls, baby wraps, tablecloths, washcloths, towels, and so much more.

The art of weaving has been passed on from mother to daughter, generation after generation. At birth, baby girls are presented with the necessary tools for weaving. At the age of eight or nine, Maya girls are taught to weave for the first time, by their mothers, older sisters, and older women.

The looms are simple, often handmade by the weaver, and easily portable because they can be rolled up when not in use. The back rod of the loom is tied to a tree or post while weaving and the other end has a strap that encircles the waist so that the weaver can move back or forward to produce the needed tension.

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A weaver using a backstrap loom usually sits on the ground but as the person ages that becomes more difficult and many will then use a small stool.

While Mayan textiles are used for daily clothing and provide protection against nature, they are also incorporated into ancient ceremonies and rituals. Women’s “traje” or traditional clothes consists of a “huipil” – a blouse made from a square or rectangular piece of woven fabric with a hole in the middle for the head and folded and stitched up the sides with arm holes. This is worn with a “corte,” a skirt that is tied at the waist with a woven belt. Textiles vary by community, and designs and colors are often indicative of a specific village. Women’s clothing identifies the woman as an individual within her culture, as well as communicating traditional Maya beliefs about the universe.

African Market Baskets

We are now offering handcrafted Bolga baskets woven by remarkable artisans in Bolgatanga, Ghana. Each basket is a one-of-a-kind treasure.

african_market_baskets

Proceeds from the sale of these baskets helps to provide healthcare, education and financial support to over 1,000 African villagers and their children.

african_market_baskets  african_market_baskets  african_market_baskets

African Market Baskets™ is a division of The Overseas Connection, Ltd., located in Boulder, Colorado.  Founder and CEO, Steve Karowe has been importing from Africa since 1991.  Since 2004, he has worked directly with artisans in Bolgatanga.  Steve Karowe also formed Every Basket Helps™, a non-profit organization created to help manage humanitarian projects in the villages of Ghana.  African Market Baskets™ donates 10% of its profits to Every Basket Helps™.

Steve travels to Africa to meet with the weavers regularly and to oversee Every Basket Helps™ projects which include:

  • Providing basic school supplies for the weavers’ children annually
  • Organizing and funding health care for the weavers and their families annually
  • Funding and building a community weaving center that serves two villages and over 400 weavers (2009)

The Story

Basket weaving has helped bring much needed income to the villages surrounding Bolgatanga, Ghana. The traditional skill which has been handed down from generation to generation provides employment to approximately 10,000 people, mostly women. An average of two baskets a week can be woven by a woman who also has household chores, firewood collection, water collection, washing and the care of her children to tend to each day.

Starting a basket Elephant Grass Weaving

Using locally-grown straw, the women create art.  View a gallery of images showing women weaving and the process from natural grass to finished basket.  This gallery shows how the grass is transformed, colored and then woven into a basket.

Baskets to Market Baskets to Market Baskets to Market

Bolgatanga and its surrounding villages are the largest producers of straw baskets in the country. Known as the crafts center of northern Ghana, Bolgatanga has a large central market where artists sell their work every third day.  See a gallery of images showing the transportation of baskets to market.

Health Care Registration

African Market Baskets™ is a member of the Fair Trade Federation.

Fair Trade Federation

Right now, we have the African Market Baskets in The Farm Store.  They make great yarn baskets, or stashing most anything!  I’ve got one in my bedroom that holds socks, and yes, a cat from time to time as well!

We do not yet offer them online.  Seems they sell so fast, I can’t get them listed!

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Thanks to all of you who help support the weavers by buying African Market Baskets.

Free Crochet Pattern – Stormy Weather Cowl

I liked this cowl pattern so much that I made three of them!  I did use three different color combinations, not sure which one I like the best.  The pattern is called Stormy Weather Cowl by Tamara Kelly.  It works up very fast with our bulky Snuggle yarn and a big hook.  The colors I used for the one below are Winter Sky and Pine Tree.

Stormy Weather Cowl - Snuggle Yarn

Love the zig zag design that is accomplished by going two rows down to create the stitch, a little tricky, but no big deal once you figure out where to put your hook!

stormy_weather_cowl_snuggle2487x640

HOOK

US 9.0mm/10.mm (M/N)

MATERIALS

One Skein each of two different colors Snuggle Yarn (I only used about half a skein of each, so there will be yarn left for another project, maybe another two tone project)

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

32 inches (81.28cm) and the width is 7 inches (17.78cm).

NOTES

This pattern is not worked in successive stitches, but rather in successive chain spaces – two rows down. It makes for a very closed fabric with lots of interest, but it’s not as hard as it might sound!  To make the cowl longer, add any multiple of 2 to the starting chain/first round. If you want a closer fitting neck warmer, just decrease by any multiple of 2.


stormy_weather_cowl_snuggle

DIRECTIONS

Round 1: With Color A, ch 61, sc in 2nd ch from hook, and each remaining ch to end; join with sl st to work in the round. (60 sts)
Alternate Round 1: FSC 60; join with sl st to work in the round. (60 sts)

Round 2: Ch 2, skip the 1st 2 sts, dc in the next st, *ch 1, dc2tog with the 1st half worked into the same st as previous st, skip 1 st in the middle, and the 2nd half worked into the next st; repeat from * to end, finishing last dc2tog with 2nd half in 1st st of previous round, ch 1, join with sl st to 1st dc of round.

Round 3: Ch 1, sc in 1st st, ch 1, skip ch-1 sp, *sc in the next st, ch 1, skip ch-1 sp; repeat from * to end, break yarn and seamless join to 1st sc of round.

Round 4: (Note: When you dc in the ch sps, be sure to enclose the ch sts of Round 2 and Round 3 in the st.) With Color B, join with sl st to any ch-1 sp in Round 2, enclosing the ch-1 sp in Round 3, ch 2, dc in next ch-1 sp of Round 2, * ch 1, dc2tog with the 1st half in the same ch sp as the previous stitch, and the 2nd half in the next ch sp; repeat from * finishing last dc2tog with 2nd half in same ch sp as join, ch 1, join with sl st to 1st dc of round.

Round 5: Repeat Round 3.

Round 6: With Color A, repeat Round 4, enclosing the ch sts of previous 2 rounds.

Round 7: Repeat Round 3.

Round 8: With Color B, repeat Round 4, enclosing the ch sts of previous 2 rounds.

Round 9: Repeat Round 3.

Round 10: With Color A, repeat Round 4, enclosing the ch sts of previous 2 rounds.

Round 11: Ch 1, sc in each st and ch sp around; break yarn and seamless join. (60 sts)

stormy_weather_cowl_snuggle_tan_heather_pine_tree480x640

This cowl is made with Snuggle yarns Pine Tree and Tan Heather.

  Stormy Weather Cowl

This color combination is Tan Heather and Winter Sky.

Stormy Weather Cowl

This color combination is Snow White and Gray Heather.

Be sure to see the Stormy Weather Cowl Tutorial and Video on the Moogly blog for further help!

What I Did With This Year’s Alpaca Fiber

There are many options when it comes to processing alpaca fiber into a value added product.  Finding a fiber mill that will help you evaluate and determine the best use of your fiber is very helpful.  Morning Star Fiber Mill, an artisan fiber mill in North Carolina, offers custom processing and did our processing for us this year.  I brought our fiber to the Great Lakes Fiber Festival in Wooster, Ohio for pick up, which was very convenient, and I had my product back in less than a month’s time.

Alpaca Roving - Medium Fawn  Alpaca Roving - Bay Black

Two of our huacaya girls, Annalise and Amelia, have been at our farm just a year.  Morning Star has a six pound minimum per color for processing into yarn and I did not have that much fiber from these two girls, so I had their fiber made into roving for spinning.  It is super soft and lovely, and I can’t wait to spin some of it!

Alpaca Yarn - White Mocha

I had been saving fiber from Sunshine and Sunscape, mother and daughter, for several years so I did have enough of their fiber to have yarn made.  I didn’t want just solid colors, so gave “artistic license” to JC Christiansen, owner at Morning Star, and said he should “play”.  He ran Sunshine’s white fiber and Sunscape’s brown fiber side by side at the carder to produce the yarn above.  I am calling it “White Mocha” even though it looks rather silver grey.

Alpaca Yarn - White Mocha Closeup

I decided on a two-ply worsted weight, a less rounded yarn with a nice “squish factor”.

Alpaca Yarn - Cappuccino

I’m calling this yarn “Cappuccino“.  It is a result of more of Sunshine’s white fiber run side by side with medium fawn, from an alpaca named “Brawny”.  For the last few years I have bought fiber from a local 4-H girl, so the remainder of the yarn was made from her fiber.

Alpaca Yarn - Milk Chocolate

The colors used in this yarn are white, and a white and medium fawn mixed to make a medium rose grey, fed side by side at the carder to produce a color I’ve called “Milk Chocolate“.

Alpaca Yarn - Dark Chocolate

This yarn called “Dark Chocolate” is medium fawn and dark fawn, fed side by side at the carder.

Suri Alpaca Roving - White

I had several years’ worth of suri seconds, so had roving made from the light colored colors, see Suri Alpaca Roving.  I have been dyeing this roving and have had lovely results, be sure to see Circus Time and Summer Delight.  Check back for a post on dyeing roving if you’d like to try this yourself, or try out one of our Roving Dyeing Kits!

Suri Alpaca Roving - Mabelle

The brown Suri Alpaca Roving is from Mabelle’s fiber.

Suri Fiber - Natural Colors Suri Fiber - Hand Dyed

I have a market for selling raw Suri Fiber to spinners, and the longer length suri fiber to doll makers.  I sell both natural colors and hand-dyed fiber, so that is what I will do with my prime suri fiber this year.  This involves skirting, tumbling, washing, dyeing, and packaging, more labor for me but less expense.  Who knows what I’ll do with our fiber next year.  I love that there are so many options.  Keeping products unique and marketable is a fun challenge!

See products made from our fiber in past years. More coming soon on how to evaluate your fiber.

Suri Alpaca Merino Lopi Lite Yarn
Mother Daughter Suri Alpaca Yarn

How to Wet Felt Flowers

A friend asked me to teach a Wet Felting Flower Class. Having never taught this particular felting project before, I thought I better figure out how. What I found is that it is simple, fun, and the flowers come out beautiful!

Here is what you need:

Wet Felting Supplies

Boot Tray (provides a textured surface to aid in the felting process and contain the water) or Towel – to work on
Towel – to dry your hands (dry fiber is sure to stick to wet hands) and roll your flower in when finished
Roving – I use alpaca because that’s what I have, or sometimes an alpaca/wool blend
Other Fiber – small bits of other fibers, scraps from other projects, yarn scraps, thread
Bubble Wrap – two small pieces, about 12″ x 12″
Liquid Soap – I like Dawn but whatever you have will work (if you have skin sensitivities, stay away from anti-bacterial soap)
Hot Water
Sponge (optional) – nice for sopping up extra water on mat
Pool Noodle
Something to Wet Fiber With – empty spray bottle, turkey baster, soup ladle, ball brauser sprinkler, or sponge

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial

Lay a piece of bubble wrap, bubble side down, on the towel or boot mat. Draft (or pull apart) small pieces of your main color of roving. Do not cut the roving. Thin wispy fibers will felt much better than blunt, cut edges.

Wet Felting Supplies

Lay the roving pieces in a round shape overlapping in the center.

Wet Felting Supplies

Add other bits of color as desired. If using yarn, Suri Locks, or thick pieces of fiber, be sure to lay a very thin piece of roving on top to “scotch tape” these thicker fibers in place, or they will not felt.

Wet Felting Supplies

Add a squirt or two of soap to the hot water. Now wet your fiber with the hot, soapy water. My absolute favorite felting tool for wetting the fiber is a ball brauser sprinkler (a tool used to water bonsai plants), but a spray bottle, turkey baster, soup ladle, sponge, or cup will also work to get water to your fiber.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial

If using a ball brauser sprinkler, squeeze the bulb before putting it in the water, drop it into the soapy water, release the bulb, and it fills itself.

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Thoroughly wet the fiber. Lay the second piece of bubble wrap on top of the fiber and press.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial

Gently push down on the fiber moving your hands all over pressing the water through the layers of fiber.  You don’t want the fiber to be sopping wet but do make sure the water completely penetrates the fibers.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial

Carefully peel back the bubble wrap to check and see that the fiber is thoroughly wet. If not, add more soapy water. Put the bubble wrap back and rub with your hands for five minutes or so.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial

Peel back the bubble wrap again, your fiber should be starting to hold together.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial

Now, roll up the bubble wrap and fiber.  Wrapping the bubble wrap and fiber around a pool noodle works well too.

Wet Felting Flower Class

Whether using a pool noodle or not, wrap the layers of bubble wrap and fiber snug, and tie in several places with yarn, string, or rubber bands to hold in place.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial
Sop up excess water with a sponge, or pour off into a bucket or sink.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial
Begin rolling the pool noodle back and forth about 50 times.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial
Unroll. Adjust fiber as needed. Wet any dry areas. Turn 90 degrees, roll layers, tie, roll 50 times. Do this a total of four times, turning your piece 90 degrees each time.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial

When your flower passes the “pinch test”, you are done. Pinch the fibers between two fingers, there should be no movement! If they still appear a loose, add a little more hot soapy water and continue rolling for a while longer. Repeat the “pinch test”.  If more felting is needed, you can also rub the flower on the boot mat.

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Unroll bubble wrap and fiber.  Warm up your flower with some very hot water.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial

Wad up fiber and throw it against the boot mat, in a bucket, or in your kitchen sink about 25 times.  Yes throw it!  This causes the fibers to shrink and harden a bit.

IMG_0733 (480x640)

Open up your flower, stretch the edges sideways.  This will help ruffle your edges, (of the flower that is).  Throw against your mat again about 25 times.  Pull on the fiber to create petals, if desired, or cut petals.  If cutting, rub on a textured surface just a little to soften the edges.

Rinse in a vinegar water solution, and then in plain water until the soap has been rinsed out.  Roll in a towel to absorb excess moisture.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial

Grab the center of your flower from the back and scrunch it up towards the center.  Use a twist tie or piece of yarn to tie the center.  Shape your flower the way you would like it to look. Allow your flower to dry this way.  I have read where people dry their flowers in egg cartons to help maintain the shape.  I have also used the umbrella hole in my rod iron table.  Your flower will dry quickly outside on a sunny day, or near a fan inside, or close to a heat vent in the winter.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial

When dry you could needle felt a center, sew on a button or beads, or leave as is.  Leave the yarn you have tied the flower with in place to give dimension to your flower, or remove it, scrunch up your flower towards the middle again and needle felt around the base for the same effect.

Wet Felting Flowers Tutorial

Just like in nature, there are many kinds of flowers when it comes to felting, along with various techniques.  Be creative, and have fun felting!

Felted Bouquet Wet Felting Kit

Felted Bouquet Wet Felting Kit

This is a kit available through our Online Store or in The Fiber Studio at Alpaca Meadows.  Click on the link or the image above to see videos for wet felting some basic flowers.  Click my board on Pinterest called Felted Flowers to see some favorites from other fiber artists.  You will find a few tutorials there too!

Live nearby?  Get a group together and come take my Wet Felting Fancy Flower Class!

Be sure to check out Knitting and Crocheting Flowers for more flower fun!

 

 

Free Crochet Pattern – Crescent Shawl

I love, love, love the new yarn called Mariquita from The Alpaca Yarn Company.  If you liked the Astral Yarn in all its beautiful colors, you will like this one too.  It has 50% tencel which is what gives it the lovely sheen like the Astral, and it is blended with 50% baby alpaca!  This Crescent Shawl, pattern by Julie Aakjaer, was perfect for the Mariquita, our new fingering weight yarn.  I used a smaller size hook than what the pattern calls for, which created a very lacy look that I think is very pretty with this yarn.

Crescent Shawl

 

HOOK

I used a 3.5 mm (E)

MATERIALS

One Skein Mariquita Yarn, the color I used is called Winter Wheat

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

I crocheted 50 rows, and ended up with a shawl that measures roughly 52 inches wide / 132.1 cm long and is 19 inches/ 48.3 cm long at the widest point.  Lovely use of the Mariquita yarn!

NOTES

The size of the shawl depends on the number of rows you crochet. Suggestions are given on the pattern for sizes from young child to adult size large, with approximate yarn requirements and recommended hook size given for each.

Sign In | Favorites Shopping Bag (0) Crescent Shawl

CH – chain
SC- single crochet
HDC  – half double crochet
DC – double crochet
PIC – picots
TOG- together
SP – space

DIRECTIONS

Click Spring Crescent Shawl Crochet Pattern!

 

Crescent Shawl

 

 

Flowers, Flowers, Flowers

I love hats with flowers, maybe not on me, but a flower just sets off a hat, makes it so much more stylish!  I love flowers, and it is Spring, so thought I would share my Flowers, Flowers, Flowers Pinterest Board.  On it you will find crocheted, knitted, fiber, and felted flowers, some with instructions and some just for inspiration!  Be sure to check out our Classic Alpaca Yarn for many, many pretty colors of 100% alpaca yarn for flower making, and my favorite patterns for Knitting and Crocheting Flowers!

Follow Alpaca Meadows’s board Flowers, Flowers, Flowers on Pinterest.

There are also many FREE flower patterns for knit and crochet, or perhaps you can create your own!  Some of the flowers shown are knit, then felted by throwing them in the washing machine and dryer.  Some have been cut out of felt, others needle felted.  Our Bloomin’ Brites Needle Felted Flowers Kit uses a combination of both cutting flowers from felt and needle felting fiber onto them.

Our Felted Bouquet Kit uses another felting technique called wet felting. Check out How to Make Wet Felted Flowers!

Happy Spring!

 

Felted Rabbits and Bunnies

In preparation to teach another Bunny Felting Class, I thought I would gather pictures of some of my favorite bunnies.  Pinterest was a great place to do that!  Felted rabbits really do come in all different shapes and sizes, some that are very simple designs that would be great for a beginning felter.  Those that have some experience with felting might want to tackle a bunny with more detail, perhaps even with bunny clothes and accessories!

Follow Alpaca Meadows’s board Felted Rabbits on Pinterest.

When it comes to needle felting, there is more than one way to felt a bunny. The following are some tutorials to help you to decide what your preference might be.

Mama Bunny and Three Bunnies Felting Tutorial
DIY Cute Wool Rabbit
Needle Felting a Bunny: A Photo Tutorial
How to Make a Cute Needle Felted Bunny for Easter

Though I don’t have a Bunny Felting Kit available yet, the House Mouse Kit or Needle Felt an Animal Friend Kit both come with instructional DVD’s to help you learn three dimensional felting.

House Mouse Felting Kit

House Mouse Kit

Needle Felt An Animal Friend Kit

Needle Felt An Animal Friend Kit

If you don’t live too far away, and would like to learn how to needle felt a bunny in The Fiber Studio at Alpaca Meadows, click Bunny Felting Class.  Organize a group of friends to come do a class with you, or join a class already scheduled!

 



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