Free Crochet Pattern – Dixie Alpaca Charm Shawl #2

For the second Dixie Alpaca Charm Shawl, I used three different yarns, one our Swizzle Alpaca Yarn, color Plum Perfection, our Astral Yarn, color Libra, and our Classic Baby Alpaca Yarn, color called White House.

Swizzle Alpaca Yarn - Plum Perfection Astral Yarn - Libra Classic Baby Alpaca Yarn - White House

Kathy Lashley of Elk Studios Crafted Crochet Designs designed this pretty shawl pattern that she calls Dixie Charm – A Summer Shawl.

Dixie Alpaca Charm Shawl

SKILL LEVEL

Easy

HOOK

US 5.5mm (I)

MATERIALS

One skein each of Swizzle Alpaca Yarn, color Plum Perfection, our Astral Yarn, color Libra, and our Classic Baby Alpaca Yarn, color called White House or colors of your own choosing.
Tapestry Needle for sewing in the ends

NOTE

Note: Each row increases by 8 st.

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

66 inches/ 167.64 cm across the top, and 31 inches/78.74 cm long from neck to point of triangle

Dixie Alpaca Charm Shawl

Click here for the pattern, and see the color changes below:

DIRECTIONS

Plum Perfection – PP
Libra – L
White House – WH

Ch 3, sl st to first ch to make ring, using Plum Perfection (PP)

Row 1 – PP
Row 2 – PP
Row 3 – L
Row 4 – PP
Row 5 – PP
Row 6-7 – PP
Row 8 – WH
Row 9: (L)
Row 10-13 – PP
Row 14 – WH
Row 15 – L
Row 16-19 – PP
Row 20 – WH
Row 21 – L
Row 22-25 – PP
Row 26 – WH
Row 27 – L
Row 28-31 – PP
Row 32 – WH
Row 33 – L
Edging – PP

Dixie Alpaca Charm Shawl

Enjoy!

Free Crochet Pattern – Dixie Alpaca Charm Shawl

Kathy Lashley of Elk Studios Crafted Crochet Designs designed this pretty shawl pattern that she calls Dixie Charm – A Summer Shawl.  I’m changing the name a bit and calling it Dixie Alpaca Charm Shawl, because I used alpaca yarn of course!  I’ve made two so far, the first one was out of our Paca Paints Yarn, a hand-painted 100% alpaca yarn, by The Alpaca Yarn Company, a color called Wisteria Way.

Dixie Alpaca Charm Shawl

Stitches Used:

SC- single crochet
HDC – half double crochet
DC – double crochet

Paca-Paints Alpaca Yarn - Wisteria Way

Dixie Charm Alpaca Shawl

SKILL LEVEL

Easy

HOOK

US 5.5mm (I)

MATERIALS

Two skeins of Paca Paints Yarn
Tapestry Needle for sewing in the ends

NOTE

Note: Each row increases by 8 st.

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

66 inches/ 167.64 cm across the top, and 31 inches/78.74 cm long from neck to point of triangle

Dixie Charm Alpaca Shawl

Click here for the pattern.


For the second shawl, I used three different yarns, one our Swizzle Alpaca Yarn, color Plum Perfection, our Astral Yarn, color Libra, and our Classic Baby Alpaca Yarn , color called White House.  I’ll list the order of yarn colors I used in my next post, or just alternate as you wish.  The White House has the least amount of yardage, so save that one for single rows.

Both alpaca shawls are available to purchase, just click one of the images.
Enjoy!

Summer Sale Days Pictures

It all started when my daughter Abby said, “you ought to invite some other vendors” for our Summer Sale Days!  We both got busy and in a relatively short amount of time, had 12 vendors that were willing to give this first-time-ever event at our farm a try.  It poured down rain the Friday before the weekend of our event, and the Monday after, but the weekend itself was beautiful!  We had a wonderful variety of vendors showcasing plants, garden art, essential oils, out-of-the-ordinary desserts and baked goods, hand-crafted jewelry, children’s boutique items, beef jerky, oven roasted almonds, honey, jams, produce, organically grown tea, and more!

Memories from Summer Sale Days

Vendors in attendance our first year were:

3 Little Brushes – Melissa Moneysmith Jordan; Delaware, Ohio
8 Sisters Bakery – Mount Gilead, Ohio
Amburgey Homestead – Adrian and Denise Amburgey; Shelby, Ohio
Corletta Metal Works – Ben Shaum; Mansfield, Ohio
DoTERRA – Lori Rupert; Ontario, Ohio
Eurka’s Garden – Erika Shifflet; Ashland, Ohio
Glitter & Stitches Boutique – Angie Burge; Marion, Ohio
Kristin Ellis Jewelry – Kristin Ellis; Galion, Ohio
Sub Rosa Tea
Tae’s Bakery – Tammy Arm; Galion, Ohio
The Candy Cabin – Mary Ruth Cook; Mansfield, Ohio
Wolf Creek Produce Farm LLC – Neil and Kelly Pfleiderer; Galion, Ohio

  Handwoven Guatemalan ItemsHandwoven Items

Abby came home from Cleveland, set up a display of African Market Baskets, Handwoven Guatemalan Items, and Guatemalan coffee.

4-H Kids and Alpacas

Two local 4-H kids, Arica and Carson, worked with their alpacas, Amelia and Annalise, and talked to visitors about alpacas.

Zavier Shuttles Visitors

Our grandson Zavier shuttled people to and from their vehicles (pictured with my husband Matt).  In case you are wondering, he did not ride the alpaca, just was the only picture of him I was able to get.

Peeps are a Hit!

Baby chicks arrived just in time for kids (and grown-ups) to enjoy, and visitors were able to enjoy the alpacas up close and personal!

Visitors Get Close to Alpacas

Of course The Farm Store was open and a huge sale was going on, a great time to stock up on Alpaca Socks and Alpaca Yarn, save on Alpaca Teddy Bears, or do some early Christmas shopping.

It was a great weekend, so much fun that we’ve decided to do it again next year …

Mark your calendars and save the date for July 21st and July 22nd!

Guatemalan Coffee

Guatemalan coffee is still available!  Purchase of coffee helps support our mission trip to Guatemala this coming January, as well as the coffee farmers it is purchased from.  This coffee is hand picked and processed by the families and farmers we serve while in Guatemala. With your help, we are able to work with the coffee farmers from whom our church purchases coffee, build water filters for families using unclean water in remote villages where there is extreme poverty, build fuel efficient stoves for those still cooking over open fires in their homes, and serve the teachers and students at Próximos Pasos, a Christian elementary school for girls in the Mayan village of Santa María de Jesús.

We have dark roast, light roast, whole beans and ground, and it is $15/pound.  Contact us to arrange for pick-up or delivery.

 

Felted Purses and Other Great Bags

Enjoy my Pinterest collection of Felted Purses and other Great Bags!


 

See my blog post on Wet Felting Purse Tips or take a Wet Felting Purse Class at Alpaca Meadows!  If there is not one scheduled, gather a few friends, contact me and together we’ll schedule a class on a date and time that works for you.

How to Make a Suri Alpaca Doll Wig

Lara Nance, doll customizer, author, (and frequent customer of doll hair from Alpaca Meadows), has a YouTube channel called Artistic Adventures.  She has done videos on many aspects of doll customizing, and most recently put together a video on Processing Alpaca Fiber for Doll Wigs.  It seems there are various techniques for making doll wigs.  Lara makes a wig cap out of T-shirt material and glue that is molded to fit the doll’s head, as shown in the following video.  This is much easier and less time consuming than another doll wig technique called rerooting.

This video focuses on how to prepare Suri Alpaca Fiber for doll wig making.

In this video, Lara completes the wig by sewing the glued alpaca wefts to the wig cap with needle and thread for a beautiful finished wig with bangs and a center part.

How to Make a Suri Alpaca Weft for Doll Hair is a mini-tutorial by Fabiola at Fig and Me.  The method she illustrates involves sewing suri fiber onto yarn with a sewing machine, then sewing it onto a crocheted cap.  For a tutorial on how to sew weft to a crochet cap, see this video by Gabi Moench-Ford or this tutorial on her blog called Fairywool Dolls.

Be sure to see:

Using Suri Fiber for Doll Hair
Tips for Purchasing Suri Fiber for Doll Hair
Doll Makers – Customer Gallery

Shop for Suri Fiber and Suri Locks at Alpaca Meadows!

Felted Flowers

This Saturday, I’ll be teaching a Wet Felting Fancy Flower Class. This Pinterest board of Felted Flowers are some of my favorites! Hope you’ll find inspiration here too.


 
 

See my tutorial on How to Wet Felt Flowers.

Felted Bouquet Wet Felting Kit

Felted Bouquet Wet Felting Kit

This is a kit available through our Online Store or Farm Store at Alpaca Meadows.  Click on the link or the image above to see videos for wet felting some basic flowers.

Other good tutorials I have found are from the Felt Magnet website, How to Make a Wet Felted Flower with Central Core and Layered Petals and How to Make an Easy 3d Wet Felted Flower

Learning to Knit – Getting Started

You have your yarn and your needles, a comfortable chair, you’re relaxed, and you’re ready to get started knitting.  There are different ways to hold your knitting needles.  Some people hold their hands over the knitting needles like a table knife and some hold them like pencils.  See How to Hold Your Knitting Needles and Yarn for pictures of the different ways.  Try both and see what is most comfortable.  There is no right or wrong way.

Casting On

Casting on is the first step in knitting and is the process of getting stitches on the needle.  There are a number of different Cast On Methods. The Loop Cast On is an easy one for beginners.  It is quick and easy, but can be difficult to keep an even tension when knitting, so exploring other methods may be in order down the road. The Knitted Cast On is an easy method and you will learn the knit stitch at the same time.  It is fairly stretchy and a good choice for many sorts of projects.  KnitPicks has a good video and tutorial on this method.

 

Knit Stitch

There is more than one way to learn the Knit Stitch. The two most common ways to knit are the English knitting method and the Continental knitting method.  Try both and see what you like best.  You may feel awkward at first.  Like everything else, learning to knit takes some practice and patience, and so does learning to hold your knitting needles and yarn.  Just start knitting – you’ll get it.

Knitting is a 4-step process:

Insert the needle

Wrap the yarn

Pull through the loop

Pull off the new stitch

 

 

You will knit all the stitches on your needle and when you have finished, you will have knit your first row.  If counting rows, your first row including the cast-on counts as row one.

When you have finished the row, you will turn your work. Exchange the needle full of stitches in your right hand for the empty needle in your left hand, and start again.  Knitting every row creates fabric with a series of ridges, each ridge being created from two rows of knit stitches.  This is called the knit stitch or garter stitch.

Purl Stitch

The Purl Stitch is next, click below to watch the video or see the tutorial.

 

The process of alternating knit and purl rows creates the stockinette stitch. When you are knitting stockinette, the side that is smooth is considered to be the right side (abbreviated ‘RS’). The purl side with the bumps and ridges is considered to be the wrong side (abbreviated ‘WS’)

Sometimes projects will require multiple skeins of yarn, which will require joining a new skein of yarn.  If possible do this at the end of the row.

Casting Off

Your knitting project is finished, congratulations!   Now you need to get your knitting off the needles.  Some refer to this process as casting off, some call is binding off.  Click below to watch the Binding Off video, or see the tutorial.

Be sure to bind off loosely or the pattern will be “gathered” at that bound edge.  If you find the edge is too tight when binding off, use a larger needle to bind off.  Also, be sure to form the stitch on the straight part of the needle, not the tip.

Finishing

Next, you will want to weave in the ends and block your scarf.  Blocking is an integral part of finishing a knitted item.  It will even out your stitches and allow your fiber to bloom!

Be sure to check out The Ultimate FREE Finishing Knitting Guide below.

The Ultimate FREE Finishing Knitting Guide

Other good knitting resources:

Learning to Knit – What You’ll Need

Top 10 Yarn Questions

How to Read a Knitting Pattern

Knitting Stitches You Need to Know

Find Your Style: Battle of English vs Continental Knitting

You might also want to check out 10 Easy Scarf Knitting Patterns for Beginners.

Happy knitting!

Craftsy Online Classes you might enjoy:

Learn Essential Beginner Knitting Skills ins New Class | Craftsy Learn to knit a scarf ins My First Scarf class | Craftsy Learn how to knit a hat ins My First Hat | Craftsy

Free Knitting Pattern – Easy Mistake Stitch Scarf

This Easy Mistake Stitch Scarf is a pattern I like to use when teaching people how to knit.  This pattern is from the Purl Soho website.  I have adapted the pattern to use with our bulky Snuggle Yarn from the Alpaca Yarn Company, and big needles, so fewer stitches are needed when casting on than what is written in the original pattern.

Hand-Knit Ribbed Snuggle Scarf

SKILL LEVEL

Easy

NEEDLES

US 11 – 8.0 mm

MATERIALS

Two skeins of Snuggle Yarn

NOTE

Ribbing is the result of alternating knit and purl stitches within the same row.   Mistake rib is a multiple of 4+3

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

Approximately 60” long x 6” wide

easy_mistake_stitch_scarf_snuggle

DIRECTIONS

Cast on 19 stitches.

K2, p2, repeat to last 3 stitches, k2, p1.

  This scarf will take two skeins of yarn, which will require joining a new skein of yarn.  If possible do this at the end of the row.

Repeat the pattern for 60 inches or to desired length. That’s it!

If you plan to knit until you run out of yarn, you will need to be sure you will have enough yarn left to bind off.   Figure out how much yarn it takes you to knit one row, plus some extra.  You can measure off a few yards and then determine whether your row takes you more or less.  This will give you an approximate amount of yarn necessary to bind off.

Bind off stitches in stitch pattern.  Be sure to bind off loosely or the pattern will be “gathered” at the bound edge.  If you find the edge is too tight when binding off, use a larger needle to bind off.  Also, be sure to form the stitch on the straight part of the needle, not the tip.

Next, you will want to weave in the ends and block your scarf.  Blocking is an integral part of finishing a knitted item.  It will even out your stitches and allow your fiber to bloom!

easy_mistake_stitch_scarf_snuggle

Be sure to check out the FREE Knitting Tutorials from Craftsy!

Knitting Stitches You Need to Know

You might also want to check out 10 Easy Scarf Knitting Patterns for Beginners and more Free Knitting Patterns on this website.

Happy knitting!

 

How To Use Hand Cards

The purpose of Hand Carding is to disentangle, separate, clean, straighten and blend fibers together for spinning into yarn.  Carding is a type of woolen preparation, where air is introduced between the fibers and can be trapped as you spin, resulting in a loftier yarn. The tools used are called Hand Cards.  Hand carders look a bit like hair brushes, and consist of two wooden paddles with sheets of fine metal teeth that brush out the fibers. Carding opens up locks of fiber and then aligns the individual fibers to be parallel with each other. Carded fibers are generally shorter, with longer and shorter fibers mixed together, and not completely smooth and even.  The result is a batt or rolag of lofty fiber that can them more easily be spun into yarn.

All-hand-cards-together

The Hand Cards available in our Online Store are made in the USA, by Strauch Fiber Equipment.  Watch the video below to see how to use them.

You may want to check out a great article on how to properly and efficiently use hand cards called “Care & Feeding of Handcards”  from the Earth Guild in Asheville, NC.

How To Prepare Wool For Spinning

For a great class on fiber preparation, check out  How To Prepare Wool For Spinning.  It is a Craftsy online class that you can watch at your convenience, and go back to when ever you want.  See more Spinning Classes here.

Guatemalan Weaving Ministry

On a mission trip to Guatemala with my daughter, I learned about a weaving ministry led by Hilda Perez.  Hilda teaches women in her village to weave.  She and her husband Roduel live in Ixcan, an area where many refugees settled after Guatemala’s civil war.  Not only is weaving a learned skill that helps to sustain the women’s families, it provides stress relief, and gives them a sense of purpose.  There’s something beautiful about helping to give another woman some purpose in her life. Hilda has about 40 women that participate in the weaving ministry.

Roduel and Hilda Perez

Hilda and Roduel travel over 10 hours to bring woven items to sell to the mission teams that travel to Santa Maria through a mission agency called Mission Impact. The items below are some that we brought back from our last trip.  They are now available in our Farm Store.  Many are listed in our Online Store, just click the images below. Proceeds will go towards purchasing more handwoven items from these talented women, and a portion of it will help fund mission trips back to Guatemala.

Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf FB7 (640x640) Guatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner
Guatemalan Handwoven Purse Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf Guatemalan Handwoven Bookcover
 Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf  Guatemalan Handwoven Purse FBFB (480x640)
 Guatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner  Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf
 Guatemalan Handwoven Bookmarks  Guatemalan Handwoven Purse  Guatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner
 Guatemalan Handwoven Cases  Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf  IMG_5377 (640x640)
 Guatemalan Handwoven Cases  Guatemalan Handwoven Bag Guatemalan Handwoven Tablerunner
Guatemalan Handwoven Purse Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf Guatemalan Handwoven Purse
Guatemalan Handwoven Bag Guatemalan Handwoven Scarf Guatemalan Handwoven Purse

Backstrap Weaving is an ancient art practiced for centuries in many parts of the world. It is still used today on a daily basis, in many parts of Guatemala by Mayan women, to weave fabric for their clothing and other needed household textiles such as shawls, baby wraps, tablecloths, washcloths, towels, and so much more.

The art of weaving has been passed on from mother to daughter, generation after generation. At birth, baby girls are presented with the necessary tools for weaving. At the age of eight or nine, Maya girls are taught to weave for the first time, by their mothers, older sisters, and older women.

The looms are simple, often handmade by the weaver, and easily portable because they can be rolled up when not in use. The back rod of the loom is tied to a tree or post while weaving and the other end has a strap that encircles the waist so that the weaver can move back or forward to produce the needed tension.

8013090_orig

A weaver using a backstrap loom usually sits on the ground but as the person ages that becomes more difficult and many will then use a small stool.

While Mayan textiles are used for daily clothing and provide protection against nature, they are also incorporated into ancient ceremonies and rituals. Women’s “traje” or traditional clothes consists of a “huipil” – a blouse made from a square or rectangular piece of woven fabric with a hole in the middle for the head and folded and stitched up the sides with arm holes. This is worn with a “corte,” a skirt that is tied at the waist with a woven belt. Textiles vary by community, and designs and colors are often indicative of a specific village. Women’s clothing identifies the woman as an individual within her culture, as well as communicating traditional Maya beliefs about the universe.



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