Free Crochet Pattern – Jessica Scarflette

This Jessica Scarflette crochet pattern is by Jessica Dassing of Chick-a-Pea Studio.  Any weight yarn will work using the appropriate hook, as there is no fit to this scarflette.

Jessica Scarflette Crocheted with Swizzle Alpaca Yarn

I used one of our Swizzle Yarns, a DK weight, and 100% alpaca.  The color is called Punk Rock Princess, now isn’t that a fun name?

Jessica Scarlette with Swizzle Alpaca Yarn

HOOK

4.0 mm (G)

MATERIALS

276 Yards or 1.3 skeins of Swizzle Yarn, enough left for another small project

NOTE

Button holes are not necessary since there are openings created by this crochet stitch. When picking out buttons, test out how they fit with your project; button size will vary with gauge and yarn choice.

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

This alpaca scarflette measures roughly 9 inches/ 23 cm wide and 39 inches/ 101 cm long.

Jessica Scarlette with Swizzle Alpaca Yarn

DIRECTIONS

Chain 28 stitches.  These include the extra 3 chains at the start of Row 1.  These chains will allow your double crochet stitches to stand up straight.

Row 1: 5dc in 4th chain from hook, *skip 2 chains, single crochet into next chain, skip 2 chains, 5 double-crochet into next chain*.  Repeat between**s until 3 chains remain. End row 1 with 3 double crochets in last chain.  Turn work.

Row 2: Chain one,*5 double-crochets into single crochet from previous row, single crochet into middle stitch of shell from previous row*. Repeat between**s until last shell, 3 double-crochet into top of chain 3.  Turn work.

Rows 3-66:  Repeat rows 1 & 2 until desired length.  Weave in ends.  Sew on buttons along one side.

Optional Edging:  Continue around the outside border of the scarflette adding shell pattern over and over again, making twice as many double crochets to round the corner stitch.
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Jessica Scarlette with Swizzle Alpaca Yarn

To print pattern, click Jessica Scarflette Crochet Pattern.  Click here to see a number of ways this scarflette can be worn, and other yarns used for this project.

The New Encyclopedia of Crochet Techniques The New Encyclopedia of Crochet Techniques Crochet-opedia

Fiber Processing Flow Chart

MILL MOVIE

There are many steps involved in processing fiber as can be seen in the chart below.  For a virtual tour inside a fiber mill, click 84 Alpacas Fiber Mill.

Fiber Processing Flow Chart

 

FIBER PROCESSING

FIBER COOPERATIVES

ALPACA FIBER EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

COMMERCIAL USER

Needle Felting Ornament Kits and Videos

Needle felting has taken off in our area.  Even those who don’t think they have the skills required or aren’t creative, have been enjoying felting classes in The Fiber Studio here at the farm, and going home with projects they are pleased with.  There is no need to have to pay attention to a pattern, such as with knitting or crocheting, so felting is a fun craft to do with a group of friends or in the evening while watching TV.

Needle Felting Ornament Kits

Just in are some new felting kits!  Among them are a variety of felted ornament kits, with instructional videos to follow.  Keep scrolling to see the videos.  Click on the images below if you’d like to order the kit.

     

Happy felting!

Be sure to check out the pictures from some of our felting classes!

Free Knitting Pattern – Seed Stitch Knit Scarf

Seed stitch, also known as moss stitch, is a basic texture stitch. It is made up of alternating knit and purl stitches.

Seed Stitch Knit Scarf

The fabric is firm, does not curl, and looks the same on both sides. It is ideal for small knits, scarves, cowls, mittens, gloves, and knits up into super cute baby items!   This is a stitch you will want to learn!

Textured Snuggle Scarf

For this scarf, I used big needles and our bulky Snuggle Yarn.  It is a very simple pattern and the texture is so pretty!

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SKILL LEVEL

Easy

NEEDLES

Size 15 (10.00 mm)

MATERIALS

157 Yards of Snuggle Yarn

NOTE

An odd number of stitches is required for seed stitch.  The trick to the seed stitch is knowing when to knit and when to purl.  You will be knitting the purl stitches and purling the knit stitches.  Starting with an odd number of stitches you will always be starting and ending the row with a knit stitch.

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

Approximately 6” wide x 60” long

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DIRECTIONS

Cast on 19 sts loosely.  Work in seed stitch, as described below, for 60 inches or to desired length. Bind off stitches.  Weave in ends.

Seed Stitch
Every Row: K1; *P1, K1; repeat from * to end of row

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 This scarf is available for purchase in any of the pretty Snuggle Yarn colors!  Click here to purchase.  To print pattern, click Seed Stitch Knit Scarf Pattern.

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Be sure to check out the FREE Knitting Tutorials from Craftsy!

Knitting Stitches You Need to Know
Knitting Stitches You Need to Know

from: Craftsy

Free Crochet Pattern – Butterfly Shawl

This crocheted shawl starts at the neck and is crocheted back and forth, from the top down.

Butterfly Crochet Shawl

 I have used one of our Swizzle yarns, 100% alpaca, from The Alpaca Yarn Company.  The color is Totally Teal.

Swizzle Yarn - Knit Swatch

This is a knit swatch from this colorway, though lighting makes it look a little more green than it is.

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HOOK

4.0 mm (G)
5.0 mm (H)

MATERIALS

528 Yards or 2.5 skeins of Swizzle Yarn

NOTE

This piece is worked back and forth from the top down, starting at the neck. After each row, turn work.

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

This alpaca shawl measures roughly 60 inches/ 152 cm across the top and 84 inches/ 213 cm around the bottom edge.

IMG_3122 (517x640)

DIRECTIONS

Begin using G hook.

Row 1: Ch 4, (dc, (ch2, 2dc)twice in 3rd ch from hook.

Row 2: Ch3, dc in sp between last two dc of prev row, (2dc, ch2, 2dc)in next two ch2 sps, 2dc in sp between last 2 dc of prev row.

Row 3: Ch3, dc in sp between last two dc on prev row, * sk next dc, 2dc in sp between sets of 2dc on prev row, (2dc, ch2, 2dc) in ch2 sp* repeat * – * once more, sk next dc, 2dc in sp between sets of 2dc on prev row, sk next dc, 2dc in sp between last 2 dc of prev row.

Row 4: Ch3, dc in sp between last two dc on prev row, * sk next dc, 2dc in all sps between, (2dc, ch2, 2dc) in ch2 sp* repeat once more, sk next dc, 2dc in all sps between, sk next dc, 2dc in sp between last 2 dc of prev row.

Row 5-20: repeat Row 4. There will be 20 sets of 2dc. Switch to H hook.

Switch to H hook.

Row 21-26: Repeat row 4

Row 27: Chain 8, sk 1 space, (sc in next sp, ch8) repeat, ending with sc in space between last 2 sts

Row 28: Ch3, 3dc, ch2, 4dc in ch 8 sp, (4dc, ch2, 4dc) in each ch8 sp

Row 29: Ch3, slst in ch2 sp, (ch8, sc in next ch2 sp) repeat around

Row 30-33: Repeat rows 28 and 29 two more times

Row 34: (Sc in sp between next dc)3x, 3dc in ch2sp, (sc in sp between next dc)3x, skip next space, repeat across row, pull tail through and weave in ends securely. This piece can be made longer by repeating either section.

Make sure to purchase enough yarn to complete your project

To print pattern, click Butterfly Shawl Crochet Pattern.

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The half-hexagon shape allows for many fun ways to wear it.  Check out a few of them here.  It drapes well and is quite versatile.

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ch chain (yo, pull through loop on hook)
sc single crochet (pull up a loop, yo, pull through two loops on hook)
dc double crochet (yo, pull up a loop, [yo, pull through two loops on hook] twice)
sp(s) space(s)
sl st slip stitch (pull a loop through stitch and also through loop on hook)
yo yarn over

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Acknowledgements

Garment design by Nancy Nagle for Nangellini Designs

Crafty’s Big Back to School Supplies and Classes Sale

This post contains affiliate links through which I might earn a small commission on purchases.  Funds earned will be used to help fund my mission trip to Guatemala.

Perfect timing, I just find out how to offer online classes, and there’s a sale offered!   Now thru 9/9/15, Craftsy is having a Big Back to School Sale offering all their classes, yarn (and yes they have alpaca yarn), and craft supplies at 50% off!

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What I love about Craftsy is once you purchase a class, you have lifetime access to that class and can go back and watch it over and over again.

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If you have questions, you can ask your instructors, and you can go at your own pace in the comfort of your own home.

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With Christmas ahead, right now is the perfect time to learn a new skill for making gifts!  Click Shop ClassesShop Yarn, or Shop Craft Supplies!

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Craftsy has over 800 online classes!  They offer topics like cooking, woodworking, photography, sewing, quilting, and more. They have some gardening classes that look interesting to me.  By all means, check it out!

How To Use A Ball Winder and Swift

Anyone that plays with yarn will be interested in two great tools, a Swift and a Ball Winder.

Swift                  Ball Winder

Otto and Joanne Strauch, owners of Strauch Fiber Equipment and makers of fine tools for spinners, demonstrate how to make a center-pull ball using these two must-have tools.

Inside the Barns at the Richland County Fair

From Richland Source
By Brittany Schock

MANSFIELD, Ohio – Rome wasn’t built in a day, and neither was the Richland County Fair. Guests may wander through the barns looking at the cute animals, but few are aware of the hard work put forth by junior fair members weeks and even months in advance.

For 15-year-old Laurasen Combs, her fair project began with the birth of her alpaca – and it was hard work from the very beginning.

“I really like the challenge, so I picked her because she was the hardest one to work with out of the whole herd,” said Combs. “She was the baby no one could catch and was the most ornery.”

Combs’ risk paid off, she won first place in obstacles and second in showmanship with her alpaca. She explained showmanship is judged on how well handler and animal work as a team, but obstacles are all about trust as the animal is led through various structures designed to simulate being out on the trail.

Laurasen Combs at the Richland County Fair

15-year-old Laurasen Combs won first place in obstacles and second place in showmanship with her alpaca at the Richland County Fair on Wednesday. Brittany Schock, Staff Reporter

“I only ran through obstacles with her twice, but we worked on trust a lot,” said Combs. “I sat in the pasture and her on a long lead, and I’d pull her close to me and let her go. That was she doesn’t associate me with work and not having fun, and having to constantly do what she’s not used to.”

While the awards are an added bonus, Combs noted her favorite part about the fair is ultimately the people.

“I like meeting new friends, seeing all my old friends and seeing how hard everybody worked on their projects,” she said.

Working with a smaller animal at the Richland County Fair this week is 15-year-old Macy Eicher of the Lucas Leaders II 4-H club. Eicher was preparing to show her rabbit on Wednesday, and she noted judges are mostly looking for meat on a rabbit.

“They flip your rabbit and they see what the meat looks like, their fur and their feet,” she said.

While there isn’t much she could do to improve the meat on her rabbit, Eicher said she learned to feed her rabbit sunflower seeds to help with their fur quality.

“I like learning what you can learn from the fair and from the rabbits,” she said.

Across the fairgrounds in the pony barn, 11-year-old Chase Davenport from Sandusky County said he’d only practiced working with his pony Penelope about a week before the Richland County Fair. But his aunt, Jessica Garcia, was quick to counter Davenport’s dedication.

“He’s been driving carts since age five – he’s always loved to do it,” said Garcia.

Garcia explained Davenport has been working with Penelope for a long time in preparation for a few other fairs, but only started preparing for the Richland County Fair last week. Davenport’s bond with Penelope was evident on Wednesday when he won first place in the 9-12 age group of the Junior Draft Horse Halter/Showmanship competition.

“We show halter by walking them in, setting them up and making sure their front and back feet are together,” said Davenport. “You walk in front of the judge and follow their directions, they look at you and then you go back in line.”

Davenport said he prepared Penelope for showing by braiding her tail, combing her mane and cleaning her feet. Garcia added the entire family camps out at the fair throughout the week, and it’s hard to keep Davenport out of the barn.

“It’s a fun family experience – we spend lots of time together,” she said.

Read the original here.

Free Crochet Shawl Patterns

I’ve been on a roll with shawls lately and have rounded up a few of my favorite FREE crochet shawl patterns for you for a little inspiration – some of these I’ve tried and some are on my to-do list!  I’ll be using Alpaca Yarn, of course!  Click on individual images to see pattern for that image, or follow this board on Pinterest.

Follow Alpaca Meadows’s board Crochet – Shawl Patterns on Pinterest.

Online Crochet Class

How to Remove Fiber from Strauch Carder

Strauch Fiber Equipment not only makes quality products, in the USA I might add, but they provide quality support, tutorials, and helpful advice.  They have a number of helpful videos, this being one of them, to help you use and enjoy their products.  Watch Otto Strauch’s video on his technique to remove all of the fiber from the large drum, useful when you want to prevent contamination of the next batt.

According to Otto, “Because of the fineness of the carding cloth, there will always be fiber left on the drum after you pull off your batt.  The amount of fiber left is usually the same quantity. So if you’re only putting on a small amount, say one-tenth of an ounce, percentage wise, a lot of it will remain on the drum. If you fill the drum with one ounce of fiber, the same amount stays on but the percentage of fiber coming off will be much greater.

Cleaning out this fiber after each batt removal is too time consuming. So, here’s what I do: After the first batt is removed, I leave the left-over fiber on the drum. I then card another batt, remove it and card the third batt. Keep doing this until you’ve made the number of batts your looking for. Now clean off the fiber still on the drum. I don’t clean the drum until I am either finished using the carder, or switching to carding a different color or type of fiber.

If you are dealing only with a small amount of fiber and need to get it all off at one time, here’s the technique I use. It’s illustrated on a one minute video entitled “Removing all the fiber at one time from the large drum”.  As you watch it you’ll see how the doffer brush is used to remove all the fiber on the drum while pulling off the batt. (The doffer brush is the brush that came with your carder and used to clean off the large drum)”.

See our selection of Strauch Carders available through our online store.  I will be posting more videos from Strauch Fiber Equipment Co, so do check back!



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