FREE Crochet Pattern – Graceful Shell Shawl

This is a great shawl to keep your shoulders warm whether you wear it to dress up with, or dress down.  I used one of our Astral yarns by The Alpaca Yarn Company, a blend of alpaca, wool, and tencel.  The color I chose is Aquarius.

Graceful Shell Shawl - Astral Yarn

This pattern was designed by Tammy Hildebrand for Red Heart.

IMG_3106 (548x640)

The photo session that followed was almost as fun as crocheting the shawl!

IMG_3109 (513x640)

Ariella takes a closer look!

IMG_3112 (518x640)

HOOK

 6.5mm (US K-10½)

MATERIALS

Astral Yarn – 3 skeins (took about 467 yards)

PATTERN NOTES

Roughly 18 inches long and 136 inches from one end of bottom edge to the other.
IMG_3114 (500x640)

DIRECTIONS

 Special Stitches cl = cluster: [yo, insert hook in indicated st or space, pull up loop, yo and draw through 2 loops on hook] 3 times, yo and draw through all 4 loops on hook.

shell: (cl, ch 6, dc in 6th ch from hook, cl) in indicated st or space.

inc-shell = increase shell: (shell, ch 6, dc in 6th ch from hook, cl) in indicated st or space.

SHAWL

Row 1 (Right Side): Ch 53; shell in 4th ch from hook (beginning ch counts as first dc), *[skip next 3 ch, shell in next ch] 2 times, skip next 3 ch, inc-shell in next ch, [skip next 3 ch, shell in next ch] 2 times, skip next 3 ch*, (shell, ch 6, dc in 6th ch from hook, shell) in next ch (2 increases made); repeat from * to *, shell in next ch, dc in last ch, turn—30 clusters and 2 dc.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as dc here and throughout), inc-shell in next ch-6 space, shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, shell in next 3 ch-6 spaces, (shell, ch 6, dc in 6th ch from hook, shell) in next ch-6 space, shell in next 3 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, inc shell in next ch-6 space, dc in top of turning ch, turn—42 clusters and 2 dc.

Row 3: Ch 3, inc-shell in next ch-6 sp, shell in next 5 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, shell in next 11 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, shell in next 5 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, dc in top of turning ch, turn—54 clusters and 2 dc.

Row 4: Ch 3, [inc-shell in next ch-6 sp, shell in next 6 ch-6 spaces] 2 times, (shell, ch 6, dc in 6th ch from hook, shell) in next ch-6 sp, [shell in next 6 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next ch-6 space] 2 times, dc in top of turning ch, turn—64 clusters and 2 dc.

Row 5: Ch 3, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, shell in each ch-6 space across to last ch-6 space, inc-shell in last ch-6 space, dc in top of turning ch, turn—72 clusters and 2 dc.

Row 6: Ch 3, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, shell in next 7 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, shell in next 8 ch-6 spaces, (shell, ch 6, dc in 6th ch from hook, shell) in next ch-6 space, shell in next 8 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, shell in next 7 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, dc in top of turning ch, turn—82 clusters and 2 dc.

Row 7: Ch 3, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, shell in next 9 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, shell in next 21 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, shell in next 9 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, dc in top of turning ch, turn—96 clusters and 2 dc.

Row 8: Ch 3, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, shell in next 11 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, shell in next 11 ch-6 spaces, (shell, ch 6, dc in 6th ch from hook, shell) in next ch-6 space, shell in next 11 ch-6 spaces, inc- shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, shell in next 11 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, dc in top of turning ch—110 clusters and 2 dc.

Row 9: Ch 3, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, shell in next 13 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, shell in next 27 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next 2 ch-6 spaces, shell in next 13 ch-6 spaces, inc-shell in next ch-6 space, dc in top of turning ch, turn—124 clusters and 2 dc. Do not fasten off.

IMG_3116 (502x640)

Edging Row 1: Ch 1, working in ends of rows across side edge, work 2 sc in end of each row; working in free loops across bottom of foundation ch, sc in each ch across; working in ends of rows across other side edge, work 2 sc in end of each row. Fasten off.

FINISHING

Weave in ends.

IMG_3118 (457x640)

If you’d like to purchase this shawl, click here.

FREE Knitting Pattern – Suri Art Yarn Cowl

Inspired by Ashley Martineau’s pattern and free video, I’ve created this cowl out of my own hand spun Suri Art Yarn.  Though the bulky, very textured yarn is a bit of a challenge, the results were well worth it!

Suri Art Yarn Cowl

NEEDLE

Circular 16″ Needles US Size 15 – 10.0 mm

MATERIALS

50 Yards of Hand Spun Suri Art Yarn

PATTERN NOTES

Roughly 30 inches around at neck edge, 8 inches wide, and 38 inches around bottom edge depending on how loosely or tightly you knit.

 

DIRECTIONS

 Make a Slip Knot, then cast on 30 stitches.  Knit in the round using the double elongated stitch until you’re reached the desired length.  Bind off loosely.

Very simple!

Fasten off, and weave in ends.

 

FREE Crochet Pattern – Head Hugger Hat with Brim

This is a very simple hat crochet pattern that I have used over and over again.  It has been adapted from the pattern called Crochet Head Hugger by Christine Marie Way Tyler & John Wesley Tyler for use with our bulky Snuggle Yarn by The Alpaca Yarn Company.

Snuggle Hat with Cuff - Group of Greens

 For this hat, I used the colorway, A Group of Greens.

Snuggle-Alpaca-Yarn-Group-of-Greens-Bulky-Yarn

Here’s the pattern:

HOOK

US Size J

MATERIALS

1 Skein of Snuggle Hand-Dyed
1 Skein of Snuggle Solids

Body of hat requires about 90 yards, brim takes about 15 yards.

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

This hat measures 21″ around at the widest point and is 8″ from the top to the bottom of the turned up brim.

PATTERN NOTES

CH 2 always counts as 1 DC.

DIRECTIONS

CH 4 or 5 (which ever you usually like to use to make a ring). SL ST in first ST to form a ring.
Round 1 – CH 2, 11 DC in ring. SL ST in top of CH 2. (12 DC)
Round 2 – CH 2, DC in the same ST. 2 DC in each ST around. SL ST in top of CH 2. (24 DC)
Round 3 – CH 2, *2 DC in next ST, DC in next ST*; Repeat around. SL ST in top of CH 2. (36 DC)
Round 4 – CH 2, DC in next ST. *2 DC in next ST, DC in next 2 ST*; Repeat around. SL ST in top of CH 2. (48 DC)

Round 5 – *CH 2, skip 1 DC, SC in next DC*; Repeat around. SL ST in top of CH 2.
Round 6 – SL ST into CH, CH 2, DC in same CH 2 space, *2 DC in each CH 2 space around*. SL ST in top of CH 2.
Round 7 – CH 2, skip the first 2 DC, SC in space between 2ND & 3RD DC, *CH 2, skip 2 DC, SC in space between DC’S of previous round*;
Repeat around. SL ST in top of CH 2.
Rounds 8 thru 13 –  Repeat rounds 5 & 6 until cap is the length that you want, ending with either round. Finish off here or add brim.

Round 14 – Change colors for brim.  Repeat rounds 5 & 6 until brim is the width you want.  Finish off.

Snuggle Hat - A Plethora of Pinks

Here is the same hat using A Plethora of Pinks.

See more patterns using our Snuggle Yarn:

CROCHET PATTERNS

Basic Chunky Cowl

Fingerless Mittens

Ohio State Snuggle Scarf

Simple Ear Warmer Pattern

KNIT PATTERNS

Easy Mistake Stitch Scarf

 

FREE Pattern – Alpaca Rug Yarn Purses

Finally, I have written down the pattern, and yardage for purses made from our Suri Alpaca Rug Yarn.  Using a big crochet hook, you’ll be surprised how quickly you can make one of these purses.  Choose one of the three sizes, or any size you want to make a purse.

Alpaca Rug Yarn Purses with Strap

IMG_1065 Medium Rug Yarn Purse with Strap Large Alpaca Rug Purse

Here’s the pattern:

HOOK

US Size S

MATERIALS

Small Purse with Strap (6″ x 2.5″ x 7″) – 25 yards Medium Purse with Strap (12″ x 3.5″ x 10″) – 55 yards Large Bag with Strap (20″ x 12″ x5″) – 115 yards

If you’re lucky, you can reach down inside a bump of rug yarn and find the end. Working from the center keeps the bump from rolling and the yarn is much easier to work with this way.

Center Pull Alpaca Rug Yarn

DIRECTIONS

Make foundation chain of 7 for Small Purse, 10 for Medium Purse, and 15 for Large Bag.

Turn and sc in 2nd chain from hook. Sc around chain increasing one stitch at each end.

2nd Round—Continue to sc around in front loops only.

Crocheting in Front Loops Only

3rd Round—Continue to sc around.

4th and following Rounds—Continue to sc around until desired height is reached.  Medium Purse has 9 rounds, Large Purse has 10 rounds.

Slip stitch into top of last sc from previous round.

Cut yarn and weave in end.

STRAP

Chain stitch to desired length.  Pull through stitch on each side of bag.  Knot.  Weave in ends.  Stitch for reinforcement.

Alpaca Rug Yarn Purse with Handle

Medium Rug Yarn Purse with Handle

Medium Purse/Bag with Handles  (11″ x  6″ x 10.5″) – 60 yards

To make this purse follow the pattern above until Round 7.

8th Round  Sc in next 5 sts, ch 6, skip next 6 sts, sc in next 5 sts, ch 6, skip next 6 sts, sc in next 5 sts. Join.

9th Round   Sc in next 5 sts, 6 sc under the ch 6 sp. Sc in next 5 sts, 6 sc under the ch 6 sp, sc in next 5 sts.  Join and finish off.

Weave in ends.

Click Image to Purchase Alpaca Rug Yarn

Super Bulky Suri Alpaca Yarn

 For a FREE Rug Crochet Pattern, click here.

FREE Knit and Crochet Patterns – Go Green!

In the spirit of Saint Patrick’s Day I’ve made a few items out of the colorway Group of Greens – Snuggle Yarn by The Alpaca Yarn Company.  There are two FREE patterns below, one a crochet pattern and the other a knit pattern.

Snuggle-Alpaca-Yarn-Group-of-Greens-Bulky-Yarn

KNIT

 The pattern used for this scarf was adapted from Purl Soho’s Easy Mistake Stitch Scarf.

Knit Scarf - Group of Greens Snuggle Yarn

  Ribs do pull in and will make this scarf narrower than you might anticipate.  If you want to add additional stitches for a wider scarf,  just make sure your cast on is in multiples of four stitches.

NEEDLES

US Size 11

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

60-inches long by approximately 6-inches wide

PATTERN NOTE

Mistake rib is a multiple of 4+3

THE PATTERN

Cast on 29 stitches.

K2, p2, repeat to last 3 stitches, k2, p1.

Repeat this row until desired length. So easy!

Weave in ends, hand wash, block and let dry.

______________________________________________________

CROCHET

 

Ear Warmer Headband - Snuggle Yarn

FREE Simple Ear Warmer Pattern

Crocheted Ear Warmer Headband

 

——————————————————————————————————————

Found this recipe on Pinterest posted by Spoonful, so simple just had to share , in the spirit of Saint Patrick’s Day!

Ingredients

Canned refrigerated bread stick dough
Colored sugar
Cinnamon

Directions

1.  Line a cookie sheet with aluminum foil and lightly coat it with cooking spray.
2.  To create the clover shape, mold 3 sections of bread sticks into hearts and press them together as shown. Attach a small stem, decorate, bake according to the package directions, and serve them up to your lucky guests.

Yards Per Ounce Calculations – Alpaca Yarn Company

I wish I would have written down how much yarn it took to make that …
Resolved to get better at keeping records, I’m adding this post to my blog for your reference and mine!

Alpaca Cowl Neck Warmer

 Using the formula from my previous post on Figuring the Yardage Used in A Finished Project,  I have come up with the following calculations for each line of yarn from The Alpaca Yarn Company.  Figuring the yardage used in a finished project made from any of these yarns, can be found by multiplying the weight of the item times the yards per ounce of that yarn.

Astral Yarn

Astral – Alpaca Blend Yarn
197 yards in a 3.5 ounce (100g) skein = 56 yards per ounce

Paca de Seda Yarn

Paca de Seda – Alpaca Blend Yarn
91 yards in a 1.76 ounce (50g) skein = 52 yards per ounce

Paca Peds Yarn

Paca Peds – Alpaca Blend Sock Yarn
360 yards in a 3.5 ounce (100g) skein = 103 yards per ounce

Paca Paints Yarn

Paca Paints – Alpaca Yarn
220 yards in a 3.5 ounce (100g) skein = 63 yards per ounce

Snuggle Yarn

Snuggle – Alpaca Blend Yarn
104 yards in a 3.5 ounce (100g) skein = 29.71 yards per ounce

Suri Elegance Yarn

Suri Elegance – Suri Alpaca Yarn
875 yards in a 3.5 ounce (100g) skein = 250 yards per ounce

Swizzle Alpaca Yarn

Swizzle – Alpaca Yarn
215 yards in a 3.5 ounce (100g) skein = 61 yards per ounce

I am in the process of creating Pinterest boards for each yarn, with links to FREE patterns for each and yardage required!  Be sure to check back!

 

Figuring the Yardage Used in a Finished Project

How do you figure the yardage used in a finished crocheted or knit project, you ask?  Well I think I’ve finally figured out how to figure this out.  If you have the label of the yarn that was used, you can find the weight of the skein and how many yards are on the skein.

Snuggle Yarn Label

This yarn label, for instance, shows that the yarn weighs 3.5 ounces (100 grams) and there is 104 yards.

If you don’t have the label or know what kind of yarn you have, there is a way to calculate the yardage, read Determining Yarn Yardage from an Unlabeled Skein.  A digital postal scale works well for weighing the yarn.

Yards divided by Ounces = Yards Per Ounce

IMG_0962 (480x640)

Using the formula above and the information from our label, I calculated 104 divided by 3.5 = 29.71.

Click to purchase Chunky Alpaca Wool Cowl

How much yarn did I use?
I used the number from the above calculation, multiplied by the weight of my finished project, and got the answer!  The Basic Chunky Cowl weighs 4.6 ounces (see pattern here).  The yarn used  has 29.71 yards per ounce, so I can multiply 4.6 times 29.71 to come up with 136.67 yards to crochet this cowl.  (If I were to knit a cowl of a similar style and size, I know it would take less yarn because knitting takes less yarn than crocheting.)

Ear Warmer Headband

This Ear Warmer Headband weighs 1.2 ounces.  This multiplied by 29.71 = 35.65 yards.

Snuggle Yarn - Plethora of Pinks

 I have this much yarn left.  This little ball weighs 1.1 ounce, multiplied by 29.71 = 32.68 yards.  Now I know that I don’t have quite enough yarn to make another headband, unless I made it a little narrower.  Or I could make a flower for the headband, or a small heart, or put it in my bag of yarn ends until I figure out how I might use it!  Hope this helps!

Video – How Much Yarn Did I Use

Crochet an Ohio State Snuggle Scarf

Okay Ohio State fans, here’s an easy project to crochet!  It doesn’t get much more basic than this, and the pattern is free!  Click Beginner’s Easy Single Crochet Scarf Free Pattern.  If you click on the link, Sandi Marshall has written a full explanation of the instructions for each row. If you are a beginner following this pattern, you will learn about the most basic crochet abbreviations, how to read a pattern, and have an understanding of how to follow some of the most common instructions found in most every crochet pattern.

Ohio State Alpaca Snuggle Scarf

For this scarf I have used a size J crochet hook, two skeins of yarn, one of Gray Heather and one called Snowberries by The Alpaca Yarn Company available through our online store or in The Fiber Studio here at the farm.

Snuggle Alpaca Yarn - Gray Heather     Snuggle Bulky Alpaca Blend Yarn - Snowberries

I adapted the pattern for the Snuggle yarn which is a bulky yarn, chaining 25 instead of 15 as instructed in the pattern.  I crocheted 12 rows of red, than alternated with 12 rows of gray, then red, gray, red, gray, finishing with 12 rows of red.   Click to watch the video on How To Change Colors Seamlessly for help with changing colors.  Of course you can make a narrower scarf, or shorter blocks of color, whatever you prefer.

Ohio State Alpaca Scarf

I finished the scarf with a single crochet stitch around the outside edge of the entire scarf, putting in a couple extras at the corners for a nice turn.

Scarf Close-up

Like the scarf, but don’t crochet or have any interest in learning?  You’re in luck!  It is available in my Etsy shop, just click here.

New Yarn – Suri Alpaca Merino Lopi Lite Yarn

One of the things I did last year with some of our suri fiber was to have it made into Lopi yarn.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Traditionally Lopi yarn comes from Icelandic sheep whose fleece is made up of two layers, each with a different kind of wool. The outer coat is water-resistant and contains long, coarse fibers, while the layer beneath is the insulating layer consisting of soft, short fibers.  The two fibers are processed together in lopi yarn and so combines the different qualities of both kinds of wool.

Icelandic Sheep

Lopi yarn is less dense than most wool yarn and is light compared to its bulk.  On big needles the bulky yarn knits up quite quickly.  It is a single ply yarn and does not have the definite twist of other yarn. The name lopi originally meant wool that hasn’t been spun at all.  Today’s lightly-processed yarn developed from experiments in the early 1900s by knitters using completely unspun wool called rovings.  The characteristic Icelandic sweater called a lopapeysa, is knit with lopi yarn.

  OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The yarn that was made from our alpacas is considered Létt-lopi (aka Lopi Lite)  and is a much lighter yarn, knitted on finer needles, but has the same characteristics of the bulkier lopi.  Felting works well because of the structure and texture of lopi.  If you’re not planning on felting your knit or crocheted item, do take care when washing, and then lay flat to dry.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After shearing this year, I combined all the similar grades of light colored fiber from our beautiful suris, and took it to Morning Star Fiber Mill in Apple Creek, Ohio.

Matterhorn is a striking Full Accoyo Multi-Colored herdsire at Alpaca Meadows.

They blended 75% suri with 25% merino of a similar micron.  It ended up a color you might call Ecru.

Suri Alpaca Merino Lopi Lite Yarn

I have hand-painted two batches of this yarn so far, and this is a colorway I am calling Berry Pie.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here is a hat crocheted from this yarn (modeled by my beautiful daughter)!

Alpaca Hat with Lopi Lite Yarn

This is another colorway called Dessert Mirage.

Suri Alpaca Merino Lopi Lite Yarn, Handpainted, Dessert Mirage

 Solid colored lopi yarn is also being used for doll hair.  Need a certain color?  Choose from the Gaywool dye colors on our website.  I would be glad to hand-paint the yarn for you or dye it a solid color, either one.  Or purchase the natural color yarn and dye it yourself!

Watch for more colors coming soon!

Fiber Arts Friday begins at WISDOM BEGINS IN WONDER! 

Photobucket

Learning to Knit

This Saturday I’ll be teaching a Learn To Knit class at the farm.  We’ll practice by making a small swatch, and then get started on a scarf. I like to use bulky yarns for beginner classes, because it goes faster, and gratification from a finished project comes sooner!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Snuggle yarns that I carry both in The Farm Store online and in The Fiber Studio here at the farm, fit the bill quite nicely.  We will be using solid colors in the class so that it is easier to see the stitches, but there are also some very pretty hand-painted colors.

Hand-Painted Snuggle Yarn - A Plethora of PinksHand-Painted Snuggle Yarn - A Group of Greens

The pattern we will be using is called Easy Mistake Stitch Scarf.  If you can knit and purl, you can make this scarf!  It looks much more difficult than it really is.

Easy Mistake Stitch Pattern

Casting on is the first step in knitting and is the process of getting stitches on the needle.  There are a number of different Cast On Methods.  The Knitted Cast On is an easy method and students learn the knit stitch at the same time.  It is fairly stretchy and a good choice for many sorts of projects.  KnitPicks has a good video and tutorial on this method.

Next comes learning the Knit Stitch, and another good video and tutorial.



 You will knit all the stitches on your needle and when you have finished, you will have knit your first row.  If counting rows, your first row including the cast-on counts as row 1.

When you have finished the row, you will turn your work. Exchange the needle full of stitches in your right hand for the empty needle in your left hand, and start again.  Knitting every row creates fabric with a series of ridges, each ridge being created from two rows of knit stitches.  This is called the garter stitch

Knitting is a 4-step process:

Insert the needle

Wrap the yarn

Pull through the loop

Pull off the new stitch

The Purl Stitch is next, click below to watch the video or see the tutorial.

The process of alternating knit and purl rows creates the stockinette stitch. When you are knitting stockinette, the side that is smooth is considered to be the right side (abbreviated ‘RS’). The purl side with the bumps and ridges is considered to be the wrong side (abbreviated ‘WS’)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Ribbing is the result of alternating knit and purl stitches within the same row, which is what we’ll be doing for the scarf we make in class.  This scarf will take two skeins of yarn, which will require joining a new skein of yarn.  If possible do this at the end of the row.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When your scarf is the desired length, it will be time to bind off.  If you plan to knit until you run out of yarn, you will need to be sure you will have enough yarn left to bind off.   Figure out how much yarn it takes you to knit one row, plus some extra.  You can measure off a few yards and then determine whether your row takes you more or less.  This will give you an approximate amount of yarn necessary to bind off.

Click below to watch the Binding Off video, or see the tutorial.

Be sure to bind off loosely or the pattern will be “gathered” at that bound edge.  If you find the edge is too tight when binding off, use a larger needle to bind off.  Also, be sure to form the stitch on the straight part of the needle, not the tip.

Next, you will want to weave in the ends and block your scarf.  Blocking is an integral part of finishing a knitted item.  It will even out your stitches and allow your fiber to bloom!

Happy knitting!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Alpaca Meadows